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HistoryTravel.org

  A global group of friends, travelers, history buffs, sharing fun and adventure through time and space: we invite you to join our group and we want to put up a free history travel blog on your behalf!

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Re-writing History to Celebrate the Forgotten Heroes

History can be resurrected from the dead, made alive in new ways and directions. History is what we make of it. We encourage you to blog about our true heroes from long ago who gave their lives for their people, for justice, for the generations to come, in the best way that they saw fit.

Let us a…

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Blog posts

Congress of Tucumán, Argentine War of Independence

The Casa de Tucumán (meaning "House of Tucumán" in Spanish, officially Casa Histórica de la Independencia) is a historic building and museum located in San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina, built during the colonial times. The Congress of Tucumán worked in this house during the Argentine War of Inde…

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San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina History Travel

Since very ancient times, a wide range of Indian tribes whose culture is still being studied have dwelled the area. Among the peoples who inhabited the territory of Tucumán, the most outstanding were the diaguitas calchaquíes, who had experienced a strong influence by the Incas. Settled in the mo…

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Central America: Destination for Spiritual Seekers

 Interest in the Mayan civilizations of Central America has intensified in recent years largely because their calendar had identified December 21, 2012 as a time of great transformation. While the exact meaning of that “transformation” is unknown, we are still here and you now have plenty of time t…

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Discover a New Civilization in Central America!

 Today, new Mayan cities --some say civilizations--are still being discovered--freed from centuries of overgrowth and opened for the world to discover.

Those who have toured more than one Mayan site find that there are no standard designs for temples, pyramids or ball courts and that some sites a…

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Re-writing History to Celebrate the Forgotten Heroes

History can be resurrected from the dead, made alive in new ways and directions. History is what we make of it. We encourage you to blog about our true heroes from long ago who gave their lives for their people, for justice, for the generations to come, in the best way that they saw fit.

Let us a…

Read more

The Archaic Period in the Americas: End of Megafauna

The Archaic period in the Americas saw a changing environment featuring a warmer more arid climate and the disappearance of the last megafauna. The majority of population groups at this time were still highly mobile hunter-gatherers; but now individual groups started to focus on resources availabl…

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"Culture Areas": Grouping North America's Indigenous

Before contact with Europeans, the indigenous peoples of North America were divided into many different polities, from small bands of a few families to large empires.

They lived in several "culture areas", which roughly correspond to geographic and biological zones and give a good indication of t…

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Páramos: Ecosystem Evolution Above the Tree Line

Few outside of the ecological community have likely heard of páramos—high, tropical habitats that occur in mountainous regions, above the tree line, but below areas that receive snow. Despite their obscurity, however, scientists get very excited about these ecosystems, which are known to be hotbeds…

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Valdivian Fertility Goddess, Ecuador, Oldest Settlement

 Valdivia, Ecuador, 130 km from Guayaquil.

The earliest permanent settlement as proved by ceramic dating dates to 3500 BC by the Valdivia on the coast of Ecuador. Other groups also formed permanent settlements. Among those groups were the Chibchas (or "Muiscas" or "Muyscas") and the Tairona, of Co…

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Terra Preta (Black Earth), Amazon Densely Populated

The Historical Mystery of the Amazon

For a long time, it was believed that Amazon forest dwellers were sparsely populated hunter-gatherer tribes. Archeologist Betty J. Meggers was a prominent proponent of this idea, as described in her book Amazonia: Man and Culture in a Counterfeit Paradise. Howe…

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Umkhonto we Sizwe, Zulu for "Spear of the Nation"

 Umkhonto we Sizwe (abbreviated as MK, Zulu for "Spear of the Nation") was the armed wing of the African National Congress (ANC), co-founded by Nelson Mandela in the wake of the Sharpeville massacre. Its founding represented the conviction in the face of the massacre that the ANC could no longer li…

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Aborigine Dreamtime Indigenous Spirituality Australia

 Australia’s indigenous people believe in the ‘Dreamtime’ and that the world, its people, and some plants and animals were created by supernatural deities at the beginning of time. 

Very religious and spiritual, the Aborigines believe in a number of deities whose form can be depicted in the…

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Prince Henry the Navigator, 1418, the "Torrid Zone"

 Prince Henry the Navigator began in 1418 to encourage the penetration of "the torrid zone": Antarctica.

In one of the first attempts at climate classification, the ancient Greek scholar Aristotle hypothesized that the earth was divided into three types of climatic zones, each based on distance fr…

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South Shetland Islands and the Antarctic Peninsula

 

Nothing in ice is comparable to the magic of the South Shetland Islands and the Antarctic Peninsula. The challenge of negotiating the Drake Passage generally takes your breathe away soon after arriving in Antarctica.

 

 

Encounter leopard seals lazing on ice floes and immense rookeries of …

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Antoine de la Sale, Councils of Mad Youth

Antoine de la Sale (c. 1388–c. 1462), author of Petit Jehan de Saintre, climbed to the crater of a volcano in the Lipari Islands in 1407, leaving us with his impressions. "Councils of mad youth" were his stated reasons for going.

Petit Jehan de Saintre is based on a principle of ambiguity and in…

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Taillevent's Jura Mountains 1430, Sheer Rock Faces

 Michault Taillevent, a poet for the Duke of Burgundy, traveled through the Jura Mountains in 1430 and left us with his personal reflections, his horrified reaction to the sheer rock faces, and the terrifying thunderous cascades of mountain streams. exercised his talent in a wide range of modes and…

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Captain James Cook's Diaries, Best Seller 1800s

 

In the 18th century, travel literature was commonly known as the book of travels, which mainly consisted of maritime diaries. In 18th century Britain, almost every famous writer worked in the travel literature form. Captain James Cook's diaries (1784) were the equivalent of today's best sellers.

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Richard Hakluyt's Voyages, Travel Literature Alive

 In 1589, Richard Hakluyt (c. 1552–1616) published Voyages, a foundational text of the travel literature genre.

was an English writer. He is known for promoting the settlement of North America by the English through his works, notably Divers Voyages Touching the Discoverie of America (1582) and

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Petrarch: Pleasure of Climbing the Mountain, Dark Ages

One of the earliest known records of taking pleasure in travel, of traveling for the sake of travel and writing about it, is Petrarch's (1304–1374) ascent of Mount Ventoux in 1336. He states that he went to the mountaintop for the pleasure of seeing the top of the famous height. His companions wh…

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Early "Travel Record Literature" in China: Fan Chengda

 

Travel literature became popular during the Song Dynasty (960–1279) of medieval China. The genre was called 'travel record literature' (youji wenxue), and was often written in narrative, prose, essay and diary style. Travel literature authors such as Fan Chengda (1126–1193) and Xu Xiake (1587–16…

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20 Blog Posts